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Cast Column-Drop -- Drop by Molten Drop

 
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RottenRodney
Craftsman



Joined: 11 Feb 2007
User's Age: (56)
Posts: 61
Location: Gopher Grove, CA

PostPosted: Sat, Mar 10 2007, 11:40 pm    Post subject: Cast Column-Drop -- Drop by Molten Drop Reply with quote

1982: "Rodney, you can't be doin' #### like that!" said Dave, my older/wiser rodding consultant. I'd just fabbed up my first column-drop for my first real hot rod. My gas-welded engineering marvel was not only strong enough to suspend the average bridge, it put the controls right where they should be without the correctional aid of 'tilt-a-whirl' technology, and it bolted directly to the existing 'A' drop, but -- it was UGLY!

Twenty-five years later:



Here's the column-drop we're bringing into existence today.



The adjustable-drop concept is not all that original. I borrowed this one from some unloved old junk car, and it spit-shined right up. Wink



Above: Razor-sharp teeth enable this adjustable drop to bite the bracket as the bracket's "wobblegated" hole allows ample column movement to custom-fit most any driver.



Encompassing the mast-jacket at it's 1 1/2" diameter mounting-point is a leather cushion which sits in a channel, (much like an insert bearing) to provide some degree of forgiveness, as we expect it may actually absorb a small amount of road-shock.



Above: In it's stock formation, the receiver-bracket is close enough in shape to work well on this Deuce, but just imagine the extra versatility a mid-point hinge (coming soon) would add...

The parts used here are rare, and I hadn't intended to repeat the procedure, but upon sharing some early development photos with friends on a lesser-traveled table, I found myself with orders to fill. I'm going to need some help with this...

Meet Jake Krottje -- 'Master Caster' -- and Pride of Palomar College.



Above: At age twenty, Jake looks serious; (mug-shot serious) about his prototype cast-aluminum dash. This one is designed to fit most Model 'A' Fords.

A year or two later: Jake is up to speed, and accepting challenges. He ain't afraid of no column-drop.



First order of business: Jake needs mold-holders, so it's off to the Quickie-Mart for a pair of bucket-size beverage cups, and there's your "drop in the bucket."



Mad-Chemistry at work:



Above: Well, I'll be dipped... Here jake mixes up his special concoction of silicone-goo. Soon the silicone will be poured into the mold-holder containing the original drop, and allowed sufficient coagulation-time.



Above: Once the silicone has cured, Jake will ever so surgically slice around the outside/center of the drop with a parting-knife.



Does Jake know how to make a "negative-impression" or what?

The time has now come for our 'Master Caster' to melt down his special mixture of waxy-goo, which will be carefully poured into the silicone mold. The trick here (according to Jake) is to find that magic temperature, (just above the point of solidification) as not to overheat and distort the silicone mold. Once poured, it will be "dunked" in a pail of water where the mold halves are then separated as the wax continues to cool.



Above: Here's your column-drop -- in living wax.



"Drat! Foiled again!" On special occasions, Jake has been known to don the "sexy silver space-suit" and sport about campus in a blatant attempt to promote 'foundry-program' awareness, and according to his last report: The chicks think he's out of this world.

"Some like it hot."



Above: Jake likes it right around thirteen-hundred degrees Fahrenheit.



Oh great, he's heating up his crucible... Next thing ya know, he'll be pre-heating aluminum atop the furnace, and it's 'show-time' -- time to pour, then he'll return the crucible to the furnace for a controlled cool-down.

In part-two, we'll address cooling times, shrinkage prevention, ceramic mold-making procedures and materials, pits, inclusions, etc. You'll see the pour, and you just might get a sneak-peek at a new product.

BTW: Jake did offer yours truly a partnership in his latest endeavor, but I've seen what can happen to well-meaning inventors, so I declined. I'm reasonably sure I can score a column-drop or two out of the deal, however, and if by chance Jake finds himself rich and famous -- he'd better by me a beer. RR

More about Jake: www.krottje.com

To be continued...
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DRD57
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PostPosted: Mon, Mar 12 2007, 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does he use the wax pieces to make a sand mold or is it something else?
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RottenRodney
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Joined: 11 Feb 2007
User's Age: (56)
Posts: 61
Location: Gopher Grove, CA

PostPosted: Mon, Mar 12 2007, 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DRD57 wrote:
Does he use the wax pieces to make a sand mold or is it something else?


Well, unless I misunderstood; the wax pieces ain't long for this world. They'll be encrusted in sand, and I think they just go away when Jake makes his pour. I'll show it to yawl as soon as I can.

High to the family -- including Blondie...
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river1
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Location: peoria az

PostPosted: Tue, Mar 13 2007, 1:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RottenRodney wrote:
DRD57 wrote:
Does he use the wax pieces to make a sand mold or is it something else?


Well, unless I misunderstood; the wax pieces ain't long for this world. They'll be encrusted in sand, and I think they just go away when Jake makes his pour. I'll show it to yawl as soon as I can.

High to the family -- including Blondie...


i believe, if it's the process i'm thinking of the wax goes away. that is why they call it "the lost wax process".

i'll wait patiently for the next part.

later jim
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DRD57
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PostPosted: Tue, Mar 13 2007, 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did some lost wax casting in H.S.

We carved the piece we wanted out of wax and then submerged that in some kind of plaster. Then we heated the plaster in an oven to melt and drin the wax leaving a plaster mold for our part. Next up was melting the metal and pouring it in the plaster mold. When that cooled we busted the plaster off and were left with the final part.
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