'32 center crossmember/X-member
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#1: '32 center crossmember/X-member Author: Charlie Chops 1940Location: Muskegon, MI PostPosted: Wed, Mar 14 2007, 6:12 pm
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Here's my last shot for tech. I wanted to have a center crossmember that had a flavor of the stock '32 k-member. I bought a Vern Tardel repop but it was too narrow so I made my own.

#1. I had the sheetmetal shop bend up a piece of 10ga that had the shape on top of a stock crossmember. I cut a hole in it for the driveshaft and raised the center for clearance similar to an original. Bolted it in for convenience since it's not done yet.

#2. I made a transmission mount that bolted to the stock mount holes on the bottom of my Richmond 6 speed. It is suspended on a pair of CE engine cushions that go on a mount that bolts to the crossmember in back and will bolt to the X or K of the finished assembly.

#3. I had some more 10ga bent into a 6" C-channel and holesawed some 3-1/2" lightening hiles in the beginning of the K. While there I fabricated a mount for the '36 ford p/u pedal assembly that I wanted to use. Then cut, bent, welded and otherwise coerced the pedals to fit my application.

#4. This shows the more or less final configuration of the pedals. They may need further adjustment for height above the floor. The pedal ratio turned out at about 6.5:1.

#5. This shows the pattern for the top and front of the leg over to the frame rail. I made this out of three pieces of 10ga welded together after I proved I could disassemble the clutch and brake assembly and remove the pedals from the frame. Adjusted slightly a couple times before I welded it into the frame.

#6. This shows the left leg completed and the master cylinder mount off the back side.

#7. The forward passenger side leg was made up similarly to the driver's side and bolted and clamped in place. With the balance of the C-channel I had bent I fabricated the rear legs of the X. The dip is for seat bolt and seat belt bolt clearances. The lightening holes will also serve for routing the exhaust system. My goal is that none of the exhaust will be visible hanging under the frame rails. I will be building a set of tri-y headers and routing the drivers side exhaust under the oil pan and down the passenger side to the rear. The passenger side exhaust will go back through the crossmember and then cross over under the driveshaft and down the drivers side which will make each side pretty close in overall length.

#2:  Author: enjenjoLocation: Swanton, Ohio PostPosted: Wed, Mar 14 2007, 6:22 pm
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Nice job Charlie, I like it.

#3:  Author: sirstudeLocation: East Helena MT PostPosted: Wed, Mar 14 2007, 6:40 pm
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Lookd really nice Charlie. Do you buy your hole saws by the truckload?

Doug

#4:  Author: Charlie Chops 1940Location: Muskegon, MI PostPosted: Wed, Mar 14 2007, 7:05 pm
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Doug,

I cut most of the holes on my mill as I can get the speed down, and it wanders a lot less than my 25 year old drill press. The other secret to that is lots of lube. I use a liquid lube made locally - don't remember the brand name.

I've cut a couple dozen 3-1/2" holes so far and the saw is still doing a good job. At the price of those rascals ya gotta make 'em stretch. I'm save the hole discs and end up making big washers out of them. The large ones are good for seat belt anchors.

Charlie

#5:  Author: enjenjoLocation: Swanton, Ohio PostPosted: Wed, Mar 14 2007, 7:48 pm
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I have been using water as a lube lately, and it seems to work as good as cutting oil, particularly on aluminum.

I have also been resharpening my hole saws, a few minutes with a file and they are as good as new.

I changed the pulley on my drill press to make it run slower, I didn't use those faster speeds anyway. Rolling Eyes

#6:  Author: jusjunkLocation: Michigan PostPosted: Thu, Mar 15 2007, 7:53 am
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enjenjo wrote:
I have been using water as a lube lately, and it seems to work as good as cutting oil, particularly on aluminum.

I have also been resharpening my hole saws, a few minutes with a file and they are as good as new.

I changed the pulley on my drill press to make it run slower, I didn't use those faster speeds anyway. Rolling Eyes



Ive never seen water used? no lubricity.. I use pipe cutting oil from menards and for aluminum the best thing to use is wd40..
Dave Arrow

#7:  Author: enjenjoLocation: Swanton, Ohio PostPosted: Thu, Mar 15 2007, 9:40 am
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jusjunk wrote:
enjenjo wrote:
I have been using water as a lube lately, and it seems to work as good as cutting oil, particularly on aluminum.

I have also been resharpening my hole saws, a few minutes with a file and they are as good as new.

I changed the pulley on my drill press to make it run slower, I didn't use those faster speeds anyway. Rolling Eyes



Ive never seen water used? no lubricity.. I use pipe cutting oil from menards and for aluminum the best thing to use is wd40..
Dave Arrow


I'm aware of the lubricity problem, but it seems to work fine with a hole saw.

#8:  Author: kb426Location: Kansas PostPosted: Thu, Mar 15 2007, 12:17 pm
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Excellent answer to your original quest. I use my mill which goes down to 60 rpm. I'm usually cutting 1430 tubing and don't use lube because I'm too lazy to clean up the mess.



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